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Gita Lenz: Photographs

Specifications

  • Hardcover
  • Dimensions: 9 5/8 x 11 1/2 in.
  • 100 pages, 52 plates
  • ISBN 978-0-9845739-0-5
  • Price: $50.00

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About this Book

Gita Lenz: Photographs is the result of the efforts of two individuals, Timothy Bartling and Gordon Stettinius. Back in 2002, when Timothy, Gita’s friend and neighbor, was helping her move into an assisted living facility in West Greenwich Village, he was not sure what should be done with all of the photographic work that she had asked him to take care of. So, he contacted Stettinius, a friend and photographer, to explore what could be done with Gita’s photography. Together, they decided that by producing a book from the work and by mounting an exhibition as well, they could generate some interest in Gita and her photography. From there, Stettinius established Candela Books in order to publish Gita’s monograph and then arranged with Gitterman Gallery, in New York, to mount a solo exhibition, and ultimately to represent Gita’s photography. This book, along with the concurrent exhibition, are meant as a tribute to honor Gita’s beautiful photography.

About the Author

Gordon Stettinius, a photographer and educator, has compiled and edited the photographs for this monograph of Gita Lenz’ photographic work and written an introduction to the work and the story behind the book. Stettinius lives and works in Richmond, Virginia and shows his own photography nationally and internationally. He is a recipient of the 2009 Theresa Pollak Award for Excellence in the Arts.

About the Artist

Gita Lenz is an American born photographer. Most active from the 1940s through the early 1960s, Lenz earned considerable recognition during her career, notably she was included in two photography exhibitions curated by Edward Steichen for the Museum of Modern Art . She was also included in a three-person show at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and had numerous articles and features in photography magazines to her credit. Though initially she might have been described as a social documentarian, Lenz quickly embraced elements of Abstract Impressionism, possibly influenced by Aaron Siskind, a prominent photographer and good friend as well. Abstract compositions, surreal subject matter, and intimate portraits all attracted Lenz’ attention and each subject was carefully considered and beautifully printed.